About The Drug Uceris aka Budesonide Rectal Foam

ClusterMed

Find Uceris side effects, uses, warnings, interactions and indications. Uceris is also known as Budesonide Rectal Foam.

Uceris

Uceris Prescription Drug Bottle
About Uceris aka Budesonide Rectal Foam

What's The Definition Of The Medical Condition Uceris?

Clinical Pharmacology

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY Mechanism Of Action Budesonide has a high topical glucocorticosteroid (GCS) activity and substantial first-pass elimination. The formulation contains budesonide in an extended release tablet core. The tablet core is enteric coated to protect dissolution in gastric juice which delays budesonide release until exposure to a pH ≥ 7 in the small intestine. Upon disintegration of the coating, the core matrix provides extended release of budesonide in a time dependent manner. Pharmacodynamics Budesonide has a high glucocorticoid effect and a weak mineralocorticoid effect, and the affinity of budesonide to GCS receptors, which reflects the intrinsic potency of the drug, is about 200fold that of cortisol and 15-fold that of prednisolone. Treatment with systemically active GCS, including UCERIS, is associated with a suppression of endogenous cortisol concentrations and an impairment of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function. Markers, indirect and direct, of this are cortisol levels in plasma or urine and response to ACTH stimulation. In a study assessing the response to ACTH stimulation test in patients treated with UCERIS 9 mg once daily, the proportion of patients with abnormal response was 47% at 4 weeks and 79% at 8 weeks. Pharmacokinetics Absorption Following single oral administration of UCERIS 9 mg in healthy subjects, peak plasma concentration (Cmax) was 1.35 ± 0.96 ng/mL, the time to peak concentration (Tmax) on average was 13.3 ± 5.9 hours, although it varied across different individual patients, and the area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC) was approximately 16.43 ± 10.52 ng·hr/mL. The pharmacokinetic parameters of UCERIS 9 mg have a high degree of variability among subjects. There was no accumulation of budesonide with respect to both AUC and Cmax following 7 days of UCERIS 9 mg once daily dosing. Food Effect A food-effect study involving administration of UCERIS to healthy volunteers under fasting conditions and with a high-fat meal indicated that the Cmax was decreased by 27% while there was no significant decrease in AUC. Additionally, a mean delay in absorption lag time of 2.4 hours is observed under fed conditions. Distribution The mean volume of distribution (VSS) of budesonide varies between 2.2 and 3.9 L/kg in healthy subjects and in patients. Plasma protein binding is estimated to be 85 to 90% in the concentration range 1 to 230 nmol/L, independent of gender. The erythrocyte/plasma partition ratio at clinically relevant concentrations is about 0.8. Metabolism Following absorption, budesonide is subject to high first-pass metabolism (80-90%). In vitro experiments in human liver microsomes demonstrate that budesonide is rapidly and extensively biotransformed, mainly by CYP3A4, to its 2 major metabolites, 6β-hydroxy budesonide and 16αhydroxy prednisolone. The glucocorticoid activity of these metabolites is negligible ( < 1/100) in relation to that of the parent compound. In vivo investigations with intravenous doses in healthy subjects are in agreement with the in vitro findings and demonstrate that budesonide has a high plasma clearance, 0.9-1.8 L/min. These high plasma clearance values approach the estimated liver blood flow, and, accordingly, suggest that budesonide is a high hepatic clearance drug. The plasma elimination half-life, t½, after administration of intravenous doses ranges between 2.0 and 3.6 hours. Excretion Budesonide is excreted in urine and feces in the form of metabolites. After oral as well as intravenous administration of micronized [3H]-budesonide, approximately 60% of the recovered radioactivity is found in urine. The major metabolites, including 6β-hydroxy budesonide and 16α-hydroxy prednisolone, are mainly renally excreted, intact or in conjugated forms. No unchanged budesonide is detected in urine. Special Populations Hepatic Impairment In patients with liver cirrhosis, systemic availability of orally administered budesonide correlates with disease severity and is, on average, 2.5-fold higher compared with healthy controls. Patients with mild liver disease are minimally affected. Patients with severe liver dysfunction were not studied. Absorption parameters are not altered, and for the intravenous dose, no significant differences in CL or VSS are observed. Renal Impairment The pharmacokinetics of budesonide in patients with renal impairment has not been studied. Intact budesonide is not renally excreted, but metabolites are to a large extent, and might therefore reach higher levels in patients with impaired renal function. However, these metabolites have negligible corticosteroid activity as compared with budesonide ( < 1/100). Drug-Drug Interactions Budesonide is metabolized via CYP3A4. Potent inhibitors of CYP3A4 can increase the plasma levels of budesonide several-fold. Co-administration of ketoconazole results in an eight-fold increase in AUC of budesonide, compared to budesonide alone. Grapefruit juice, an inhibitor of gut mucosal CYP3A, approximately doubles the systemic exposure of oral budesonide. Conversely, induction of CYP3A4 can result in the lowering of budesonide plasma levels [See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION and DRUG INTERACTIONS]. Oral contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol, which are also metabolized by CYP3A4, do not affect the pharmacokinetics of budesonide. Budesonide does not affect the plasma levels of oral contraceptives (ie, ethinyl estradiol). Clinical Studies Induction Of Remission In Active Mild To Moderate Ulcerative Colitis Two similarly-designed, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies were conducted in a total of 970 adult patients with active, mild to moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) which was defined as an Ulcerative Colitis Disease Activity Index (UCDAI of ≥ 4 and ≤ 10). Eight-hundred ninety-nine of these patients had histology consistent with active UC; this was considered the primary analysis population. UCDAI is a four-component scale (total score of 0 to 12) that encompasses the clinical assessments of stool frequency, rectal bleeding, mucosal appearance and physician's rating of disease activity (score of 0 to 3 for each of the components). The baseline median UCDAI score in both studies was 7. In Study 1, 56% of patients were male, and the median age was 42 years. In Study 2, 57% of patients were male, and the median age was 44 years. In Study 1, 50% of patients were Caucasian, 7% were African American, and 34% were Asian. In Study 2, more than 99% were Caucasian. Both studies compared UCERIS 9 mg and 6 mg with placebo and included an active reference arm (a mesalamine 2.4 g in Study 1; and a budesonide* 9 mg not approved for the treatment of UC in Study 2). The primary endpoint was induction of remission after 8 weeks of treatment. Remission was defined as a UCDAI score of ≤ 1, with subscores of 0 for rectal bleeding, stool frequency, and mucosal appearance and with a ≥ 1 point reduction in an endoscopy-only score.2 In both studies, UCERIS 9 mg extended release tablets demonstrated superiority to placebo in inducing remission (Table 4). Table 4: Induction of Remission in Studies 1 and 2 Treatment Group Study 1 n/N (%) Study 2 n/N (%) UCERIS 9 mg 22/123 (17.9) 19/109 (17.4) UCERIS 6 mg 16/121 (13.2) 9/109 (8.3) Reference Arm* 15/124 (12.1) 13/103 (12.6) Placebo 9/121 (7.4) 4/89 (4.5) Treatment Difference between UCERIS 9 mg and Placebo (95% CI)† 10.4% (2.2%, 18.7%) 12.9% (4.6%, 21.3%) Remission is defined as a UCDAI score of ≤ 1, with subscores of 0 for rectal bleeding, stool frequency, and mucosal appearance and with a ≥ 1 point reduction in an endoscopy-only score.2 The primary analysis population included only patients that had histology consistent with active UC. CI=Confidence Interval *The reference arm in Study 1 is a delayed release mesalamine 2.4 g; the reference arm in Study 2 is a budesonide 9 mg not approved for the treatment of UC. †p < 0.025 for UCERIS 9 mg vs. placebo in both Studies 1 and 2 based on the Chi-square test (alpha = 0.025) REFERENCES 2. Rachmilewitz D. Coated mesalazine (5-aminosalicylic acid) versus sulphasalazine in the treatment of active ulcerative colitis: a randomised trial. BMJ. 1989;298: 82-6.

Clinical Pharmacology

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY Mechanism Of Action Budesonide has glucocorticosteroid (GCS) activity. Pharmacodynamics Treatment with glucocorticosteroids, including UCERIS rectal foam, is associated with a suppression of endogenous cortisol concentrations and an impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function. These effects were measured by determination of plasma cortisol concentrations and responses to adrenocorticotropin challenge (i.e., ACTH stimulation test) in 2 placebo-controlled, 6-week trials in patients with active disease [see Clinical Studies]. These trials enrolled subjects with post ACTH stimulation cortisol level of > 18 mcg/dL at baseline. Subjects received UCERIS rectal foam 2 mg or a placebo twice daily for 2 weeks followed by once daily for 4 weeks. Normal morning serum cortisol levels > 5 μg/dL were maintained in 85% and 84% of UCERIS rectal foam treated subjects during Weeks 1 and 2 (twice daily treatment) and 93% and 94% during Weeks 4 and 6 (once daily treatment), respectively (see Table 3). At baseline (predose), 84% of subjects in the UCERIS rectal foam group had a normal response to the ACTH challenge and at Week 6, 63% of subjects had a normal response to the ACTH challenge; in the placebo group, these values were 86% and 76%, respectively (see Table 3). ACTH stimulation test was not performed routinely during the twice daily treatment period (Weeks 1 and 2). Table 3: Proportion of Subjects with Normal Endogenous Cortisol Levels ( > 5 μg/dL) During the Study and Proportion of Subjects with Normal Response to ACTH Challenge Cortisol Parameter UCERIS Rectal Foam 2 mg/25 mL N = 268 n (%) Placebo N = 278 n (%) Total cortisol > 5μg/dL (lower limit of normal range) Baseline 259/268 (96.6) 275/278 (98.9) Week 1 224/263 (85.2) 264/269 (98.1) Week 2 216/257 (84.0) 263/266 (98.9) Week 4 218/235 (92.8) 243/249 (97.6) Week 6 211/224 (94.2) 234/241 (97.1) Normal response to ACTH challengea Baseline 222/266 (83.5) 238/278 (85.6) Week 6b 148/236 (62.7) 180/237 (75.9) a The normal response to ACTH challenge included 3 criteria, as defined in the cosyntropin label: 1) morning cortisol level > 5 μg/dL; 2) increase in cortisol level by > 7 μg/dL above the morning (pre-challenge) level following ACTH challenge; and cortisol level of > 18 μg/dL following ACTH challenge. b Denominator includes 20 subjects in the UCERIS rectal foam arm and 2 subjects in the placebo arm who discontinued prior to week 6 due to adverse events related to low cortisol or abnormal response to ACTH challenge. Pharmacokinetics Absorption Distal Ulcerative Colitis Patients Based on population pharmacokinetic analysis from sparse PK samples from phase 3 studies, the estimated AUC0-12 following administration of UCERIS rectal foam 2 mg twice a day was 4.31 ng*hr/mL with a CV of 64% in the target patient population. Distribution The volume of distribution (Vss) of budesonide varies between 2.2 and 3.9 L/kg in healthy subjects and in patients. Plasma protein binding is estimated to be 85 to 90% in the concentration range of 1 to 230 nmol/L, independent of gender. The erythrocyte/plasma partition ratio at clinically relevant concentrations is approximately 0.8. Metabolism Following absorption, budesonide is subject to first-pass metabolism. In vitro experiments in human liver microsomes demonstrate that budesonide is rapidly and extensively biotransformed, mainly by CYP3A4, to its 2 major metabolites, 6β-hydroxy budesonide and 16α-hydroxy prednisolone. The glucocorticoid activity of these metabolites is negligible ( < 1/100) in relation to that of the parent compound. In vivo investigations with intravenous doses in healthy subjects demonstrate that budesonide has a plasma clearance of 0.9-1.8 L/min. These plasma clearance values approach the estimated liver blood flow, suggesting that budesonide is a high hepatic clearance drug. Excretion Budesonide is excreted in urine and feces in the form of metabolites. After oral as well as intravenous administration of micronized [3H]-budesonide, approximately 60% of the recovered radioactivity is found in urine. The major metabolites, including 6β-hydroxybudesonide and 16α-hydroxyprednisolone, are mainly renally excreted, intact or in conjugated forms. No unchanged budesonide is detected in urine. Specific Populations Hepatic Impairment The effect of hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics of UCERIS rectal foam has not been studied. In a study in patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class A and Child-Pugh Class B) dosed with budesonide 4 mg oral capsules, systemic exposure was similar between patients with mild hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class A; n=4) and healthy subjects (n=8), and 3.5-fold higher in patients with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class B; n=4) than in healthy subjects. For the intravenous dose, no significant differences in CL or VSS are observed. Patients with severe liver dysfunction (Child-Pugh Class C) were not studied [see Use in Specific Population]. Renal Impairment The pharmacokinetics of budesonide in patients with renal impairment has not been studied. Intact budesonide is not renally excreted, but metabolites are to a large extent, and might therefore reach higher levels in patients with impaired renal function. However, these metabolites have negligible corticosteroid activity as compared with budesonide. Drug-Drug Interactions Budesonide is metabolized via CYP3A4. Potent inhibitors of CYP3A4 can increase the plasma concentrations of budesonide. Co-administration of ketoconazole (inhibitor of CYP3A4) results in an 8-fold increase in AUC of oral budesonide, compared to budesonide alone. Grapefruit juice, an inhibitor of gut mucosal CYP3A, approximately doubles the systemic exposure of oral budesonide. Conversely, induction of CYP3A4 can result in the lowering of budesonide plasma concentrations. The effect of CYP3A4 inhibitors and inducers on the pharmacokinetics of UCERIS rectal foam have not been studied [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION and DRUG INTERACTIONS]. Oral contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol, which are also metabolized by CYP3A4, do not affect the pharmacokinetics of oral budesonide. Budesonide does not affect the plasma concentrations of oral contraceptives (i.e., ethinyl estradiol). In vitro interactions studies performed with budesonide showed that budesonide did not inhibit human cytochrome P450 isoenzymes CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, or CYP2E1 at concentrations ranging from 0.11 to 1130 ng/mL. Isoenzyme CYP3A4 was inhibited at the highest concentration tested but the IC50 was > 1130 ng/mL. UCERIS rectal foam is not expected to inhibit these enzymes in clinical use. No significant induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9 or CYP3A4/5 expression was observed in human hepatocytes in vitro at budesonide concentrations up to 9000 nM (3.88 mcg/mL). In an in vitro study, budesonide was not a substrate of human transporters OATP1B3 and may be a weak substrate of OATP1B1. Budesonide at concentrations up to 300 nM (129 ng/mL) did not inhibit OATP1B1 or OATP1B3. Budesonide was not a substrate of BCRP and was a weak substrate of P-glycoprotein. Budesonide was a weak inhibitor of P-glycoprotein (IC50 9.78 µM or 4.21 mcg/mL) and BCRP (IC50 43.1 µM or 18.6 mcg/mL). UCERIS rectal foam is not expected to inhibit these transporters in clinical use. Clinical Studies The safety and efficacy of UCERIS rectal foam were evaluated in 2 replicate, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center trials (Studies 1 and 2). Participants in the trials were adult patients with active mild-to-moderate distal ulcerative colitis with disease extending at least 5 cm but no further than 40 cm from the anal verge (confirmed by endoscopy). To be eligible, patients had to have a Modified Mayo Disease Activity Index (MMDAI) score between 5 and 10, inclusive, a rectal bleeding subscore of 2 or 3, and an endoscopy subscore of 2 or 3. The MMDAI score ranges from 0 to 12 and has 4 subscales that are each scored from 0 (normal) to 3 (most severe): stool frequency, rectal bleeding, findings on endoscopy, and physician global assessment. An endoscopy subscore of 2 is defined by marked erythema, lack of vascular pattern, friability, and erosions; an endoscopy subscore of 3 is defined by spontaneous bleeding and ulceration. Oral and rectal corticosteroids, and rectal 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) products were prohibited during the course of the trials, but were allowed as rescue therapy. Oral 5-ASA products were allowed at doses ≤ 4.8 grams/day. In total, 546 subjects were randomized in these trials: 267 subjects to UCERIS rectal foam and 279 subjects to placebo. In each trial (Study 1 and Study 2), patients received UCERIS rectal foam 2 mg or placebo twice daily for 2 weeks followed by once daily for 4 weeks. The median age was 41 years and 42 years, 5% and 8% were ≥ 65 years of age, and 43% and 45% were male, in Studies 1 and 2, respectively. In each of these trials, 90% were Caucasian, 7-8% were African American, and 3% were Asian or Other. The majority of patients had a baseline diagnosis of proctosigmoiditis (69% and 74%) in Studies 1 and 2, respectively. The remaining patients had a baseline diagnosis of proctitis. Concomitant oral 5-ASA use at baseline was 59% and 51% in Studies 1 and 2, respectively. Baseline MMDAI total score was 7.8 and 7.9 in the UCERIS rectal foam group and placebo group, respectively, of Study 1; and 7.9 and 8.0 in the UCERIS rectal foam group and placebo group, respectively, of Study 2. The mean stool frequency subscore at baseline was 1.8 and 1.9 in the UCERIS rectal foam group and placebo group, respectively, of Study 1; and 1.7 and 1.8 in the UCERIS rectal foam group and placebo group, respectively, of Study 2. In each trial (Study 1 and Study 2), the primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects who were in remission after 6 weeks of treatment. Remission was defined as a decrease or no change in the stool frequency subscore from baseline, a rectal bleeding subscore of 0, and an endoscopy score of 0 or 1. (An endoscopy subscore of zero is defined by normal or inactive disease; an endoscopy subscore of 1 is defined by erythema and decreased vascular pattern.) In each trial (Study 1 and Study 2), a higher proportion of patients in the UCERIS rectal foam group than in the placebo group were in remission at Week 6, and had a rectal bleeding subscore of 0 at Week 6 (Table 4). Table 4: Efficacy Results: Studies 1 and 2 Efficacy Endpoint Study 1 UCERIS Rectal Foam N=133 Placebo N=132 p-valueb Treatment Difference (95% CI) Remission at Week 6a 38.3% 25.8% 0.032 12.6% (1.5%, 23.7%) Rectal Bleeding subscore = 0 at Week 6 46.6% 28.0% 0.002 18.6% (7.2%, 30%) Study 2 UCER IS Rectal Foam N=134 Placebo N=147 p-valueb Treatment Difference (95% CI) Remission at Week 6a 44.0% 22.4% < 0.001 21.6% (10.8%, 32.4%) Rectal Bleeding subscore = 0 at Week 6 50.0% 28.6% < 0.001 21.4% (10.3%, 32.6%) a Remission was defined as an endoscopy subscore of 0 or 1, a rectal bleeding subscore of 0, and a decrease or no change in stool frequency subscore from baseline. b p-values obtained from the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel (CMH) test. CI: Confidence Interval In Study 1, the percentage of patients with endoscopy subscore of 0 or 1 at Week 6 was 55.6% in the UCERIS rectal foam group versus 43.2% in the placebo group. In Study 2, the percentage of patients with endoscopy subscore of 0 or 1 at Week 6 was 56.0% in the UCERIS rectal foam group versus 36.7% in the placebo group (an endoscopy subscore of 0 is defined by normal or inactive disease; an endoscopy subscore of 1 is defined by erythema and decreased vascular pattern). In patients that met the primary endpoint of remission in Study 1, the mean (SD) decrease in stool frequency subscore was 1.2 (0.9) in the UCERIS rectal foam group and 1.2 (0.8) in the placebo group. In patients that met the primary endpoint of remission in Study 2, the mean (SD) decrease in stool frequency subscore was 1.3 (0.8) in the UCERIS rectal foam group and 1.1 (0.9) in the placebo group.

Drug Description

UCERIS (budesonide) Extended Release Tablets DESCRIPTION UCERIS (budesonide) extended release tablets, for oral administration, contain budesonide, a synthetic corticosteroid, as the active ingredient. Budesonide is designated chemically as (RS)11β, 16α, 17,21 tetrahydroxypregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione cyclic 16,17-acetal with butyraldehyde. Budesonide is provided as a mixture of two epimers (22R and 22S). The empirical formula of budesonide is C25H34O6 and its molecular weight is 430.5. Its structural formula is: Budesonide is a white to off-white, tasteless, odorless powder that is practically insoluble in water, sparingly soluble in alcohol, and freely soluble in chloroform. UCERIS, a delayed and extended-release tablet, is coated with a polymer film, which breaks down at or above pH 7.0. The tablet core contains budesonide with polymers that provide for extended release of budesonide. Each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: stearic acid, lecithin, microcrystalline cellulose, hydroxypropylcellulose, lactose, silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, methacrylic acid copolymer types A and B, talc, triethylcitrate, and titanium dioxide.

Drug Description

Find Lowest Prices on UCERIS® (budesonide) Rectal Foam DESCRIPTION UCERIS rectal foam contains budesonide, a non-halogenated synthetic glucocorticoid, as the active ingredient. It is a mixture of the 2 epimers (22R and 22S) differing in the position of an acetal chain. Both epimers are active glucocorticoids applied in a mixture of approximately 1:1. Budesonide is designated chemically as (RS)-11β, 16α, 17,21 tetrahydroxypregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione cyclic 16,17-acetal with butyraldehyde. The empirical formula of budesonide is C25H34O6 and its molecular weight is 430.5. Its structural formula is: UCERIS rectal foam contains 2 mg budesonide per metered dose. Inactive ingredients: cetyl alcohol, citric acid monohydrate, edetate disodium, emulsifying wax, polyoxyl (10) stearyl ether, propylene glycol, and purified water. Propellant: n-butane, isobutane, and propane.

Indications & Dosage

INDICATIONS UCERIS (budesonide) extended release tablets are indicated for the induction of remission in patients with active, mild to moderate ulcerative colitis. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Mild To Moderate Ulcerative Colitis The recommended dosage for the induction of remission in adult patients with active, mild to moderate ulcerative colitis is 9 mg taken orally once daily in the morning with or without food for up to 8 weeks. UCERIS should be swallowed whole and not chewed, crushed or broken. CYP3A4 Inhibitors If concomitant administration with ketoconazole, or any other CYP3A4 inhibitor, is indicated, patients should be closely monitored for increased signs and/or symptoms of hypercorticism. Avoid grapefruit juice, which is known to inhibit CYP3A4, when taking UCERIS. In these cases, discontinuation of UCERIS or the CYP3A4 inhibitor should be considered [See DRUG INTERACTIONS and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. HOW SUPPLIED Dosage Forms And Strengths White, round, biconvex extended release tablets debossed with “MX9”. Each extended release tablet contains 9 mg budesonide. Storage And Handling UCERIS (budesonide) extended release tablets 9 mg, are white, round, biconvex tablets and debossed with “MX9”. They are supplied as follows: NDC (68012-309-30): Bottles of 30 tablets. Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15 -30°C (59 -86°F). [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Keep container tightly closed. Protect from light and moisture. Manufactured for Santarus, Inc., Raleigh, NC 27615 -1-888-778-0887. Manufactured by: Cosmo S.p.A., Milan, Italy. Revised: Oct 2016

Indications & Dosage

INDICATIONS UCERIS rectal foam is indicated for the induction of remission in patients with active mild to moderate distal ulcerative colitis extending up to 40 cm from the anal verge. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Dosage The recommended dosage regimen is 1 metered dose administered rectally twice daily for 2 weeks followed by 1 metered dose administered rectally once daily for 4 weeks. Administration Instructions Advise patients: UCERIS rectal foam is only to be applied rectally. It is not for oral use. Before using UCERIS rectal foam, use the bathroom to empty your bowels. Each applicator is coated with a lubricant. If additional lubrication is needed, petrolatum or petroleum jelly can also be used. Warm the canister in the hands while shaking it vigorously for 10 to 15 seconds prior to use. UCERIS rectal foam can be used in a standing, lying or sitting position (e.g., while using the toilet). Apply UCERIS rectal foam in the morning and the evening for the first 2 weeks of treatment; then once daily in the evening for the next 4 weeks. When applied in the evening, use immediately prior to bedtime. Try not to empty your bowels again until the next morning. Avoid concomitant use of CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., ketoconazole, grapefruit juice) during treatment with UCERIS rectal foam. HOW SUPPLIED Dosage Forms And Strengths UCERIS rectal foam is formulated as an emulsion which is filled into an aluminum canister with an aerosol propellant. It is available in 1 strength: 2 mg budesonide per metered dose. Storage And Handling UCERIS rectal foam is supplied as a kit containing 2 aerosol canisters with 28 PVC applicators coated with paraffin lubricant for administration of the foam (NDC 65649-651-03). Each canister (NDC 65649-651-02) is labeled with a net weight of 33.4g and contains 14 metered doses. Storage Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F); excursions permitted to 15° to 30°C (59° to 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Handling UCERIS rectal foam contains a flammable propellant. Do not have the canister burned after use and do not spray contents directly towards flames. Do not expose to heat or store at temperatures above 120°F (49°C). Flammable. Avoid fire, flame, or smoking during and immediately following administration. Contents under pressure. Do not puncture or incinerate. DO NOT REFRIGERATE. Distributed by: Salix Pharmaceuticals, a division of Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC Bridgewater, NJ 08807 USA. Revised: Nov 2015

Medication Guide

PATIENT INFORMATION UCERIS (u SAIR us) (budesonide) (bew DEH so nide) extended release tablets What is UCERIS extended release tablets? UCERIS is a prescription corticosteroid medicine used to help get mild to moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) under control (induce remission). It is not known if UCERIS is safe and effective in children. Who should not take UCERIS extended release tablets? Do not take UCERIS extended release tablets if: you are allergic to budesonide or any of the ingredients in UCERIS extended release tablets. See the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients in UCERIS extended release tablets. What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking UCERIS extended release tablets? Before you take UCERIS extended release tablets tell your healthcare provider if you: have liver problems are planning to have surgery have chicken pox or measles or have recently been near anyone with chicken pox or measles have an infection have or had a family history of diabetes, cataracts or glaucoma have or had tuberculosis have high blood pressure (hypertension) have decreased bone mineral density (osteoporosis) stomach ulcers any other medical condition are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if UCERIS extended release tablets will harm your unborn baby. are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. UCERIS extended release tablets can pass into your breast milk and may harm your baby. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will take UCERIS extended release tablets or breastfeed. You should not do both. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter vitamins, and herbal supplements. UCERIS extended release tablets and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine. How should I take UCERIS extended release tablets? Take UCERIS extended release tablets exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it. Your healthcare provider will tell you how many UCERIS extended release tablets to take. Take UCERIS extended release tablets in the morning. Take UCERIS extended release tablets whole with water. Do not chew, crush, or break UCERIS extended release tablets before swallowing. If you take too much of UCERIS, call your healthcare provider right away or go to the nearest hospital emergency room. What should I avoid while taking UCERIS extended release tablets? Do not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice while taking UCERIS extended release tablets. Eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice can increase the level of UCERIS extended release tablets in your blood. What are the possible side effects of UCERIS extended release tablets? UCERIS can cause some serious side effects, including: Effects of having too much corticosteroid medicine in your blood (hypercorticism). Long-time use of UCERIS extended release tablets can cause you to have too much glucocorticosteroid medicine in your blood. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of the following signs and symptoms of hypercorticism: acne bruise easily rounding of your face (moon face) ankle swelling thicker or more hair on your body and face a fatty pad or hump between your shoulders (buffalo hump) pink or purple stretch marks on the skin of your abdomen, thighs, breasts and arms Adrenal suppression. When UCERIS extended release tablets is taken for a long period of time (chronic use), the adrenal glands do not make enough steroid hormones (adrenal suppression). Tell your healthcare provider if you are under stress or have any symptoms of adrenal suppression during treatment with UCERIS extended release tablets including: tiredness vomiting weakness low blood pressure nausea Immune system effects and a higher chance of infections. UCERIS extended release tablets weaken your immune system. Taking medicines that weaken your immune system makes you more likely to get infections. Avoid contact with people who have contagious diseases such as chicken pox or measles, while taking UCERIS extended release tablets. Tell your health care provided about any signs or symptoms of infection during treatment with UCERIS extended release tablets, including: fever chills pain feeling tired aches nausea and vomiting Worsening of allergies. If you take certain other corticosteroid medicines to treat allergies, switching to UCERIS extended release tablets may cause your allergies to come back. These allergies may include eczema (a skin disease) or rhinitis (inflammation inside your nose). Tell your healthcare provider if any of your allergies become worse while taking UCERIS extended release tablets. The most common side effects of UCERIS extended release tablets include: headache bloating nausea acne decreased blood cortisol levels urinary tract infection stomach-area pain joint pain tiredness constipation stomach or intestinal gas Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of UCERIS extended release tablets. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. How should I store UCERIS extended release tablets? Store UCERIS extended release tablets at room temperature, between 68 °F to 77 °F (20°C to 25°C) Keep the bottle tightly closed to protect UCERIS from light and moisture. Keep UCERIS extended release tablets and all medicines out of the reach of children. General Information about UCERIS extended release tablets Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a patient information leaflet. Do not use UCERIS for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give UCERIS to other people, even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them. If you would like more information, talk with your healthcare provider. You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for information about UCERIS that is written for health professionals. For more information go to www.UCERIS.com or call (1-888-778-0887). What are the ingredients in UCERIS extended release tablets? Active Ingredients: budesonide Inactive ingredients: stearic acid, lecithin, microcrystalline cellulose, hydroxypropylcellulose, lactose, silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, methacrylic acid copolymer types A and B, talc, triethylcitrate, and titanium dioxide. This Patient Information has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Medication Guide

PATIENT INFORMATION UCERIS® (u SAIR us) (budesonide) rectal foam What is UCERIS rectal foam? UCERIS rectal foam is a prescription corticosteroid medicine used to help get mild to moderate active ulcerative colitis that extends from the rectum to the sigmoid colon under control (induce remission). It is not known if UCERIS rectal foam is safe and effective in children. Who should not use UCERIS rectal foam? Do not use UCERIS rectal foam if you are allergic to budesonide or any of the ingredients in UCERIS rectal foam. See the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients in UCERIS rectal foam. What should I tell my healthcare provider before using UCERIS rectal foam? Before you use UCERIS rectal foam, tell your healthcare provider if you: have liver problems are planning to have surgery have chicken pox or measles or have recently been near anyone with chicken pox or measles have an infection have or had a family history of diabetes, cataracts or glaucoma have or had tuberculosis have high blood pressure (hypertension) have decreased bone mineral density (osteoporosis) stomach ulcers any other medical condition are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if UCERIS rectal foam will harm your unborn baby. are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. UCERIS rectal foam can pass into your breast milk and may harm your baby. You and your healthcare provider should decide if you will use UCERIS rectal foam or breastfeed. You should not do both. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. UCERIS rectal foam and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take another medicine that contains corticosteroids for other conditions, such as allergies or asthma. Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine. How should I use UCERIS rectal foam? See the “Instructions for Use” at the end of this Patient Information for detailed information about the right way to use UCERIS rectal foam. Use UCERIS rectal foam exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to use it. UCERIS rectal foam should only be used rectally (through the anus). Do not take UCERIS rectal foam by mouth. Warm the UCERIS rectal foam canister by holding it in your hands while shaking it for 10 to 15 seconds. UCERIS rectal foam is used twice a day for the first 2 weeks of treatment (in the morning and in the evening). After 2 weeks, use UCERIS 1 time a day in the evening, before bedtime for 4 weeks. If you use too much UCERIS rectal foam, call your healthcare provider right away. You should stop using UCERIS rectal foam before preparing for a colonoscopy. Call your healthcare provider before restarting UCERIS rectal foam after your colonoscopy. What should I avoid while using UCERIS rectal foam? Do not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice while using UCERIS rectal foam. Eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice can increase the level of UCERIS rectal foam in your blood. UCERIS rectal foam is flammable. Avoid fire, flame and smoking during and right after using UCERIS rectal foam. What are the possible side effects of UCERIS rectal foam? UCERIS rectal foam may cause serious side effects, including: Effects of having too much corticosteroid medicine in your blood (hypercorticism). Long-time use of UCERIS rectal foam can cause you to have too much glucocorticosteroid medicine in your blood. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any of the following signs and symptoms of hypercorticism: acne bruise easily rounding of your face (moon face) ankle swelling thicker or more hair on your body and face a fatty pad or hump between your shoulders (buffalo hump) pink or purple stretch marks on the skin of your abdomen, thighs, breasts and arms Adrenal suppression. When UCERIS rectal foam is used for a long period of time (chronic use), the adrenal glands may not make enough steroid hormones (adrenal suppression). Tell your healthcare provider if you are under stress or have any symptoms of adrenal suppression during treatment with UCERIS rectal foam including: tiredness weakness nausea vomiting low blood pressure Immune system effects and a higher chance of infections. UCERIS rectal foam may weaken your immune system. Taking medicines that weaken your immune system makes you more likely to get infections. Avoid contact with people who have contagious diseases such as chicken pox or measles while using UCERIS rectal foam. Tell your healthcare provider about any signs or symptoms of infection during treatment with UCERIS rectal foam, including: fever chills aches feeling tired pain nausea or vomiting Worsening of allergies. If you take certain other corticosteroid medicines to treat allergies, switching to UCERIS rectal foam may cause your allergies to come back. These allergies may include eczema (a skin disease) or inflammation inside your nose (rhinitis). Tell your healthcare provider if any of your allergies become worse while using UCERIS rectal foam. The most common side effects of UCERIS rectal foam include: decreased blood cortisol levels adrenal insufficiency nausea Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of UCERIS rectal foam. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may also report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. How should I store UCERIS rectal foam? Store UCERIS rectal foam at room temperature, between 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C). Do not store the UCERIS rectal foam container near heat or store at temperatures above 120°F (49°C). Do not puncture or burn the UCERIS rectal foam canister. Do not refrigerate. Keep UCERIS rectal foam and all medicines out of the reach of children. General Information about UCERIS rectal foam Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information leaflet. Do not use UCERIS rectal foam for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give UCERIS rectal foam to other people, even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them. This Patient Information leaflet summarizes the most important information about UCERIS rectal foam. If you would like more information, talk with your healthcare provider. You may ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for information about UCERIS rectal foam that is written for health professionals. For more information, go to www.UCERIS.com. What are the ingredients in UCERIS rectal foam? Active ingredients: budesonide Inactive ingredients: cetyl alcohol, citric acid monohydrate, edetate disodium, emulsifying wax, polyoxyl (10) stearyl ether, propylene glycol, and purified water Propellant: n-butane, isobutane, and propane This Patient Information has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Instructions for Use UCERIS® ( u SAIR us) (budesonide) rectal foam Read the Patient Information and Instructions for Use that comes with UCERIS® rectal foam before you start using it. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have any questions. Before using UCERIS rectal foam, you should use the bathroom to empty your bowels. You may use UCERIS rectal foam while in a standing position, in a lying position, or in a sitting position (for example, while using the toilet). Applicators should be used only 1 time. You should use a new applicator for each dose. Figure A Each kit contains (See Figure A): Complete Prescribing Information Patient Information and Instructions for Use 2 canisters containing 14 doses each 4 trays of single-use applicators (7 applicators per tray) Applicator disposal bags for use after each dose Preparing to use UCERIS rectal foam Step 1: Twist Safety Tab to Remove Before the first use, remove the safety tab from under the pump dome (See Figure B). The canister cannot be used if safety tab is not removed. Figure B Step 2: Attach the Applicator The applicators are in a special tray. Hold the tray firmly and pull to remove 1 applicator. Push the applicator firmly onto the nozzle of the canister (See Figure C). Each applicator is coated with a lubricant. If needed, you can apply an additional lubricant, such as Vaseline® (petrolatum, petroleum jelly). Figure C Step 3: Align Notch to Nozzle To unlock the canister, twist the dome on the top of the canister until the semi-circular notch underneath the dome is in line with the nozzle (See Figure D). Figure D Step 4: Warm and Shake Canister Warm the canister by holding it in your hands while shaking it vigorously for 10 to 15 seconds (See Figure E). Step 5: Turn the Canister Upside Down Place your forefinger on the top of pump dome and then turn the canister upside down (See Figure F). The canister will only work properly when held with the pump dome pointing down. Figure F Step 6: Insert the Applicator into Rectum Insert the applicator into your rectum as far as it is comfortable. The easiest way to use UCERIS rectal foam is to keep one foot on the floor and raise the other foot onto a firm surface such as a chair or stool (See Figure G). Figure G Step 7: Give a Dose of UCERIS Rectal Foam To give a dose of UCERIS rectal foam, use your forefinger to fully push down the pump dome one time and hold it for about 2 seconds in that position (See Figure H). Figure H Step 8: Release and Hold Release finger pressure on the pump dome and hold the applicator in place for 10 to 15 seconds (See Figure I). Figure I Step 9: Remove the Applicator (See Figure J) The foam will still expand a little and may drop out of the applicator or anus. Figure J Step 10: Remove Applicator from Canister Remove the applicator from the canister and place the used applicator in the plastic bag provided. (See Figure K). Throw the plastic bag away in your household trash. Figure K Step 11: Twist Notch on Dome Away from Nozzle To prevent loss of UCERIS rectal foam from the canister between uses, turn the pump dome around so that the semi-circular notch faces the opposite direction to the nozzle (See Figure L). Figure L Wash your hands with soap and water. Try not to empty your bowels until the next morning. This Instructions for Use has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Overdosage & Contraindications

OVERDOSE Reports of acute toxicity and/or death following overdosage of glucocorticosteroids are rare. Treatment consists of immediate gastric lavage or emesis followed by supportive and symptomatic therapy. If glucocorticosteroids are used at excessive doses for prolonged periods, systemic glucocorticosteroid effects such as hypercorticism and adrenal suppression may occur. For chronic overdosage in the face of severe disease requiring continuous steroid therapy, the dosage may be reduced temporarily. Single oral budesonide doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg were lethal in female and male mice, respectively. The signs of acute toxicity were decreased motor activity, piloerection and generalized edema. CONTRAINDICATIONS UCERIS is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to budesonide or any of the ingredients of UCERIS. Anaphylactic reactions have occurred with other budesonide formulations [See ADVERSE REACTIONS].

Overdosage & Contraindications

OVERDOSE Acute overdosage with UCERIS rectal foam is unlikely. However, UCERIS rectal foam is absorbed systemically and chronic overdosage may result in signs/symptoms of hypercorticism [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. CONTRAINDICATIONS UCERIS rectal foam is contraindicated in patients with a history of a known hypersensitivity to budesonide or any of the ingredients of UCERIS rectal foam. Reactions have included anaphylaxis [see ADVERSE REACTIONS].

Side Effects & Drug Interactions

SIDE EFFECTS Systemic glucocorticosteroid use may result in the following: Hypercorticism and Adrenal Suppression [See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] Symptoms of steroid withdrawal in those patients transferring from Systemic Glucocorticosteroid Therapy [See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] Immunosuppression [See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] Increased Systemic Glucocorticosteroid Susceptibility [See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] Other Glucocorticosteroid Effects [See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The safety of UCERIS has been evaluated in controlled and open-label clinical trials which enrolled a combined total of 1,105 patients with ulcerative colitis. In two 8-week, placebo-controlled studies in patients with active disease (Study 1 and Study 2), a total of 255 patients received UCERIS 9 mg, 254 patients received UCERIS 6 mg, and 258 patients received placebo. They ranged in age from 18-77 years (mean 43), 56% were male, and 75% were Caucasian. The most common adverse reactions were headache, nausea, decreased blood cortisol, upper abdominal pain, fatigue, flatulence, abdominal distension, acne, urinary tract infection, arthralgia, and constipation. The adverse reactions occurring in 2% or more of patients on therapy with UCERIS 9 mg are summarized in Table 1. Table 1: Summary of Adverse Reactions in Two Placebo-Controlled Trials Experienced by at Least 2% of the UCERIS 9 mg Group (Studies 1 and 2) UCERIS 9 mg (N = 255) n (%) UCERIS 6 mg (N = 254) n (%) Placebo (N = 258) n (%) Headache 29 (11.4) 37 (14.6) 27 (10.5) Nausea 13 (5.1) 12 (4.7) 11 (4.3) Decreased Blood Cortisol 11 (4.3) 6 (2.4) 1 (0.4) Upper Abdominal Pain 10 (3.9) 8 (3.1) 5 (1.9) Fatigue 8 (3.1) 5 (2.0) 5 (1.9) Flatulence 6 (2.4) 8 (3.1) 5 (1.9) Abdominal Distension 6 (2.4) 4 (1.6) 2 (0.8) Acne 6 (2.4) 2 (0.8) 5 (1.9) Urinary Tract Infection 5 (2.0) 1 (0.4) 1 (0.4) Arthralgia 5 (2.0) 5 (2.0) 4 (1.6) Constipation 5 (2.0) 1 (0.4) 2 (0.8) Of UCERIS 9 mg patients, a total of 15% discontinued treatment due to any adverse event (including adverse reactions) compared with 17% in the placebo group. Table 2 summarizes the percentages of patients reporting glucocorticoid related effects in the 2 placebo-controlled studies. Table 2: Summary of Glucocorticoid Related Effects in Two Placebo-Controlled Trials (Studies 1 and 2) UCERIS 9 mg (N = 255) n (%) UCERIS 6 mg (N = 254) n (%) Placebo (N = 258) n (%) Overall 26 (10.2) 19 (7.5) 27 (10.5) Mood changes 9 (3.5) 10 (3.9) 11 (4.3) Sleep changes 7 (2.7) 10 (3.9) 12 (4.7) Insomnia 6 (2.4) 6 (2.4) 8 (3.1) Acne 6 (2.4) 2 (0.8) 5 (1.9) Moon face 3 (1.2) 3 (1.2) 4 (1.6) Fluid retention 2 (0.8) 3 (1.2) 3 (1.2) Hirsutism 1 (0.4) 0 0 Striae rubrae 0 0 2 (0.8) Flushing 0 1 (0.4) 3 (1.2) No clinically significant differences were observed with respect to the overall percentages of patients with any glucocorticoid related effects between UCERIS and placebo after 8 weeks of induction therapy. Study 3 was an open-label study evaluating UCERIS 9 mg once daily for 8 weeks in 60 patients who had previously completed an 8-week induction study (Study 1), but had not achieved remission. Among patients who took UCERIS 9 mg up to 16 weeks cumulatively across Study 1 and Study 3 combined, similar rates of adverse reactions and glucocorticoid-related effects were seen compared to those who took UCERIS 9 mg for 8 weeks in Study 1. In Study 4, the safety of long-term treatment with UCERIS 6 mg was evaluated in a placebo-controlled 12-month maintenance study of 123 patients. Patients who had previously completed 8 weeks of therapy in any induction study (Study 1, 2, or 3) and were in remission were randomized to UCERIS 6 mg or placebo once daily for 12 months. In patients who took UCERIS 6 mg for up to 12 months, similar rates of adverse reactions were seen between placebo and UCERIS 6 mg. After up to 12 months of study treatment, 77% (27/35) of the patients in the UCERIS 6 mg and 74% (29/39) of the patients in the placebo treatment groups had normal bone density scans. In Study 4, the glucocorticoid related effects were similar in patients with up to 12 months of therapy with UCERIS 6 mg and placebo (Table 3). Table 3: Summary of Glucocorticoid Related Effects Over 12-month Treatment (Study 4) UCERIS 6 mg (N = 62) n (%) Placebo (N = 61) n (%) Overall 9 (14.5) 7 (11.5) Insomnia 4 (6.5) 4 (6.6) Mood changes 4 (6.5) 2 (3.3) Moon face 3 (4.8) 3 (4.9) Sleep changes 3 (4.8) 3 (4.9) Acne 3 (4.8) 0 Hirsutism 3 (4.8) 0 Flushing 1 (1.6) 1 (1.6) Fluid retention 1 (1.6) 1 (1.6) Postmarketing Experience In addition to adverse events reported from clinical trials, the following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of oral budesonide. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. These events have been chosen for inclusion due to either their seriousness, frequency of reporting or causal connection to UCERIS, or a combination of these factors. Gastrointestinal Disorders: diarrhea, rectal bleeding General Disorders and Administrative Site Conditions: peripheral edema Immune System Disorders: anaphylactic reactions Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders: muscle cramps/spasms Nervous System Disorders: benign intracranial hypertension, dizziness Psychiatric Disorders: mood swings Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: rash Vascular Disorders: increased blood pressure DRUG INTERACTIONS Interaction With CYP3A4 inhibitors Concomitant oral administration of ketoconazole (a known inhibitor of CYP3A4 activity in the liver and in the intestinal mucosa) caused an eight-fold increase of the systemic exposure to oral budesonide. If treatment with inhibitors of CYP3A4 activity (such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, ritonavir, indinavir, saquinavir, erythromycin) is indicated, discontinuation of UCERIS should be considered. After extensive intake of grapefruit juice (which inhibits CYP3A4 activity predominantly in the intestinal mucosa), the systemic exposure for oral budesonide increased about two times. Ingestion of grapefruit or grapefruit juice should be avoided in connection with UCERIS administration [See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Inhibitors Of Gastric Acid Secretion Since the dissolution of the coating of UCERIS is pH dependent, the release properties and uptake of the compound may be altered when UCERIS is used after treatment with gastric acid reducing agents (e.g., PPIs, H2-blockers and antacids)

Side Effects & Drug Interactions

SIDE EFFECTS Serious and important adverse reactions include: Hypercorticism and adrenal axis suppression [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] Symptoms of steroid withdrawal in those patients transferring from systemic glucocorticosteroid therapy [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] Increased susceptibility to infection [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] Other glucocorticosteroid effects [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared with rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The data described below reflect exposure to UCERIS rectal foam in 332 patients with active mild to moderate distal ulcerative colitis extending up to 40 cm from the anal verge. The median duration of exposure was 42 days. This included 14 patients exposed for at least 6 months. UCERIS rectal foam was studied primarily in 2 placebo-controlled, 6-week trials in patients with active disease (Study 1 and Study 2). In these trials, 268 patients received UCERIS rectal foam 2 mg twice a day for 2 weeks followed by 2 mg once a day for 4 weeks [see Clinical Studies]. The most common adverse reactions ( ≥ 2% of the UCERIS rectal foam or Placebo group and at higher frequency in the UCERIS rectal foam group) were decreased blood cortisol, adrenal insufficiency, and nausea (Table 1). Decreased blood cortisol was defined as a morning cortisol level of < 5 mcg/dL. Adrenal insufficiency was defined as a cortisol level of < 18 mcg/dL at 30 minutes post challenge with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). A total of 10% of UCERIS rectal foam-treated patients discontinued treatment due to an adverse reaction compared with 4% of placebo-treated patients. Table 1: Summary of Adverse Reactions in 2 Placebo Controlled Trials* (Studies 1and 2) Adverse Reaction UCERIS Rectal Foam 2 mg/25 mL N = 268 n (%) Placebo N = 278 n (%) Decreased blood cortisol# 46 (17) 6 (2) Adrenal insufficiency† 10 (4) 2 (1) Nausea 6 (2) 2 (1) * Experienced by ≥ 2% of the UCERIS rectal foam or Placebo group and at higher frequency in the UCERIS rectal foam group # Decreased blood cortisol was defined as a morning cortisol level of < 5 mcg/Dl † Adrenal insufficiency was defined as a cortisol level of < 18 mcg/dL at 30 minutes post challenge with ACTH. Of the 46 UCERIS rectal foam treated patients with decreased blood cortisol (defined as a morning cortisol level of < 5 mcg/dL) reported as an adverse event, none had adrenal insufficiency (defined as a cortisol level of < 18 mcg/dL at 30 minutes post challenge with ACTH) (see Table 2). All cases of adrenal insufficiency resolved. Table 2 summarizes the percentages of patients reporting glucocorticoid related effects in the 2 placebo-controlled trials (Studies 1 and 2). Table 2: Summary of Glucocorticoid Related Effects in Two Placebo- Controlled Trials (Studies 1 and 2) Adverse Reaction UCERIS Rectal Foam 2 mg/25 mL N = 268 n (%) Placebo N = 278 n (%) Overall 60 (22) 10 (4) Blood cortisol decreased 46 (17)* 6 (2) Adrenal insufficiency 10 (4) 2 (1) Insomnia 1 (0.4) 1 (0.4) Sleep disorder 1 (0.4) 0 Acne 1 (0.4) 0 Depression 1 (0.4) 1 (0.4) Hyperglycemia 1 (0.4) 0 * Decreases in serum cortisol levels associated with budesonide treatment were seen at Weeks 1 and 2 (twice-daily treatment) in the UCERIS rectal foam group, but gradually returned to baseline levels during the 4 weeks of once daily treatment. No clinically significant differences were observed with respect to the overall percentages of patients with any glucocorticoid related effects between UCERIS rectal foam and placebo after 6 weeks of therapy. For additional details on morning cortisol levels and the response to the ACTH stimulation test, see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY. Post-Marketing Experience In addition to adverse reactions reported from clinical trials for UCERIS rectal foam, the following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of other oral and rectal formulations of budesonide. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. Cardiac disorders: hypertension Gastrointestinal disorders: pancreatitis General disorders and administration site conditions: pyrexia, peripheral edema Immune System Disorders: anaphylactic reactions Nervous System Disorders: dizziness, benign intracranial hypertension Psychiatric Disorders: mood swings Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders: pruritus, maculo-papular rash, allergic dermatitis DRUG INTERACTIONS CYP3A4 Inhibitors The active ingredient of UCERIS rectal foam, budesonide, is metabolized by CYP3A4. Inhibitors of CYP3A4 activity (such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, ritonavir, indinavir, saquinavir, erythromycin, cyclosporine and grapefruit juice) can increase systemic budesonide concentrations. Avoid concomitant use of CYP3A4 inhibitors with UCERIS rectal foam [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY].

Warnings & Precautions

WARNINGS Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section. PRECAUTIONS Hypercorticism And Adrenal Axis Suppression When glucocorticosteroids are used chronically, systemic effects such as hypercorticism and adrenal suppression may occur. Glucocorticosteroids can reduce the response of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stress. In situations where patients are subject to surgery or other stress situations, supplementation with a systemic glucocorticosteroid is recommended. Since UCERIS is a glucocorticosteroid, general warnings concerning glucocorticoids should be followed. Transferring Patients From Systemic Glucocorticosteroid Therapy Care is needed in patients who are transferred from glucocorticosteroid treatment with higher systemic effects to glucocorticosteroids with lower systemic effects, such as UCERIS, since symptoms attributed to withdrawal of steroid therapy, including those of acute adrenal suppression or benign intracranial hypertension, may develop. Adrenocortical function monitoring may be required in these patients and the dose of glucocorticosteroid treatment with high systemic effects should be reduced cautiously. Immunosuppression Patients who are on drugs that suppress the immune system are more susceptible to infection than healthy individuals. Chicken pox and measles, for example, can have a more serious or even fatal course in susceptible patients or patients on immunosuppressant doses of glucocorticosteroids. In patients who have not had these diseases, particular care should be taken to avoid exposure. How the dose, route, and duration of glucocorticosteroid administration affect the risk of developing a disseminated infection is not known. The contribution of the underlying disease and/or prior glucocorticosteroid treatment to the risk is also not known. If exposed, therapy with varicella zoster immune globulin (VZIG) or pooled intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), as appropriate, may be indicated. If exposed to measles, prophylaxis with pooled intramuscular immunoglobulin (IG) may be indicated. (See prescribing information for VZIG and IG.) If chicken pox develops, treatment with antiviral agents may be considered. Glucocorticosteroids should be used with caution, if at all, in patients with active or quiescent tuberculosis infection, untreated fungal, bacterial, systemic viral or parasitic infections. Replacement of systemic glucocorticosteroids with UCERIS tablets may unmask allergies (e.g., rhinitis and eczema), which were previously controlled by the systemic drug. Increased Systemic Glucocorticoid Susceptibility Reduced liver function affects the elimination of glucocorticosteroids, and increased systemic availability of oral budesonide has been demonstrated in patients with liver cirrhosis [See Use in Specific Populations]. Other Glucocorticosteroid Effects Caution should be taken in patients with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, peptic ulcer, glaucoma or cataracts, or with a family history of diabetes or glaucoma, or with any other condition where glucocorticosteroids may have unwanted effects. Patient And Counseling Information See FDA-Approved Patient Labeling (PATIENT INFORMATION). Patients being treated with UCERIS extended release tablets should receive the following information and instructions. This information is intended to aid the patient in the safe and effective use of UCERIS. Hypercorticism And Adrenal Suppression Patients should be advised that UCERIS extended release tablets may cause systemic glucocorticosteroid effects of hypercorticism and adrenal suppression. Patients should taper slowly from systemic corticosteroids if transferring to UCERIS extended release tablets [See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. Immunosuppression Patients who are on immunosuppressant doses of glucocorticosteroids should be warned to avoid exposure to chickenpox or measles and, if exposed, to consult their physician immediately. If exposure to such a person occurs, and the patient has not had chicken pox or been properly vaccinated, a physician should be consulted immediately. Patients should be informed of potential worsening of existing tuberculosis, fungal, bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections, or ocular herpes simplex [See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. How To Take UCERIS Extended Release Tablets UCERIS extended release tablets should be swallowed whole with water and NOT CHEWED, CRUSHED, OR BROKEN. Patients should be advised to avoid the consumption of grapefruit juice for the duration of their UCERIS therapy [See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION]. Nonclinical Toxicology Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment Of Fertility Carcinogenicity Carcinogenicity studies with budesonide were conducted in rats and mice. In a two-year study in Sprague-Dawley rats, budesonide caused a statistically significant increase in the incidence of gliomas in male rats at an oral dose of 50 mcg/kg (approximately 0.05 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis). In addition, there were increased incidences of primary hepatocellular tumors in male rats at 25 mcg/kg (approximately 0.023 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis) and above. No tumorigenicity was seen in female rats at oral doses up to 50 mcg/kg (approximately 0.05 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis). In an additional two-year study in male Sprague-Dawley rats, budesonide caused no gliomas at an oral dose of 50 mcg/kg (approximately 0.05 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis). However, it caused a statistically significant increase in the incidence of hepatocellular tumors at an oral dose of 50 mcg/kg (approximately 0.05 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis). The concurrent reference glucocorticosteroids (prednisolone and triamcinolone acetonide) showed similar findings. In a 91-week study in mice, budesonide caused no treatment-related carcinogenicity at oral doses up to 200 mcg/kg (approximately 0.1 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis). Mutagenesis Budesonide was not genotoxic in the Ames test, the mouse lymphoma cell forward gene mutation (TK+/-) test, the human lymphocyte chromosome aberration test, the Drosophila melanogaster sex-linked recessive lethality test, the rat hepatocycte UDS test and the mouse micronucleus test. Impairment Of Fertility In rats, budesonide had no effect on fertility at subcutaneous doses up to 80 mcg/kg (approximately 0.07 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis). However, it caused a decrease in prenatal viability and viability in pups at birth and during lactation, along with a decrease in maternal body-weight gain, at subcutaneous doses of 20 mcg/kg (approximately 0.02 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis) and above. No such effects were noted at 5 mcg/kg (approximately 0.005 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis). Use In Specific Populations Pregnancy Teratogenic Effects Pregnancy Category C Budesonide was teratogenic and embryocidal in rabbits and rats. Budesonide produced fetal loss, decreased pup weights, and skeletal abnormalities at subcutaneous doses of 25 mcg/kg in rabbits (approximately 0.05 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis) and 500 mcg/kg in rats (approximately 0.5 times the maximum recommended human dose on a body surface area basis). There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Budesonide should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Nonteratogenic Effects Hypoadrenalism may occur in infants born of mothers receiving glucocorticosteroids during pregnancy. Such infants should be carefully observed. Nursing Mothers The disposition of budesonide when delivered by inhalation from a dry powder inhaler at doses of 200 or 400 mcg twice daily for at least 3 months was studied in eight lactating women with asthma from 1 to 6 months postpartum.1 Systemic exposure to budesonide in these women appears to be comparable to that in non-lactating women with asthma from other studies. Breast milk obtained over eight hours post-dose revealed that the maximum budesonide concentration for the 400 and 800 mcg total daily doses was 0.39 and 0.78 nmol/L, respectively, and occurred within 45 minutes after inhalation. The estimated oral daily dose of budesonide from breast milk to the infant is approximately 0.007 and 0.014 mcg/kg/day for the two dose regimens used in this study, which represents approximately 0.3% to 1% of the dose inhaled by the mother. Budesonide plasma concentrations obtained from five infants at about 90 minutes after breast feeding (and about 140 minutes after drug administration to the mother) were below quantifiable levels ( < 0.02 nmol/L in four infants and < 0.04 nmol/L in one infant). The recommended daily dose of UCERIS extended release tablets is higher (9 mg daily) compared with inhaled budesonide (up to 800 μg daily) given to mothers in the above study. The maximum budesonide plasma concentration following a 9 mg daily dose (in both single-and repeated-dose pharmacokinetic studies) of oral budesonide is approximately 5-10 nmol/L which is up to 10 times higher than the 1-2 nmol/L for a 800 mcg daily dose of inhaled budesonide at steady state in the above inhalation study. Since there are no data from controlled trials on the use of UCERIS by nursing mothers or their infants, and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from UCERIS, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue UCERIS, taking into account the clinical importance of UCERIS to the mother. Budesonide is secreted in human milk. Data from budesonide delivered via dry powder inhaler indicates that the total daily oral dose of budesonide available in breast milk to the infant is approximately 0.3% to 1% of the dose inhaled by the mother. Assuming the coefficient of extrapolation between the inhaled and oral doses is constant across all dose levels, at therapeutic doses of UCERIS, budesonide exposure to the nursing child may be up to 10 times higher than that by budesonide inhalation. Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness of UCERIS in pediatric patients have not been established. Glucocorticosteroids, such as UCERIS may cause a reduction of growth velocity in pediatric patients. Geriatric Use Clinical studies of UCERIS did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, UCERIS should be used cautiously in elderly patients due to the potential for decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy. Hepatic Impairment Patients with moderate to severe liver disease should be monitored for increased signs and/or symptoms of hypercorticism. Discontinuing the use of UCERIS tablets should be considered in these patients [See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. REFERENCES 1. Falt A, Bengtsson T, Kennedy B, et al. Exposure of infants to budesonide through breast milk of asthmatic mothers. J. Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007;120(4):798-802.

Warnings & Precautions

WARNINGS Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section. PRECAUTIONS Hypercorticism And Adrenal Axis Suppression When glucocorticosteroids are used chronically, systemic effects such as hypercorticism and adrenal suppression may occur. Glucocorticosteroids can reduce the response of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stress. In situations where patients are subject to surgery or other stress situations, supplementation with a systemic glucocorticosteroid is recommended. Since UCERIS rectal foam contains a glucocorticosteroid, general warnings concerning glucocorticoids should be followed [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Reduced liver function affects the elimination of glucocorticosteroids, and increased systemic availability of oral budesonide has been demonstrated in patients with liver cirrhosis [see Use in Specific Populations]. Impaired Adrenal Suppression In Patients Transferred From Other Glucocorticoids Monitor patients who are transferred from glucocorticosteroid treatment with higher systemic effects to glucocorticosteroids with lower systemic effects, such as UCERIS rectal foam, since symptoms attributed to withdrawal of steroid therapy, including those of acute adrenal suppression or benign intracranial hypertension, may develop. Adrenocortical function monitoring may be required in these patients and the dose of glucocorticosteroid treatment with high systemic effects should be reduced cautiously. Replacement of systemic glucocorticosteroids with UCERIS rectal foam may unmask allergies (e.g., rhinitis and eczema), which were previously controlled by the systemic drug. Increased Risk Of Infection Patients who are on drugs that suppress the immune system are more susceptible to infection than healthy individuals. Chicken pox and measles, for example, can have a more serious or even fatal course in susceptible patients or patients on immunosuppressant doses of glucocorticosteroids. In patients who have not had these diseases, particular care should be taken to avoid exposure. How the dose, route and duration of glucocorticosteroid administration affect the risk of developing a disseminated infection is not known. The contribution of the underlying disease and/or prior glucocorticosteroid treatment to the risk is also not known. If exposed, therapy with varicella zoster immune globulin (VZIG) or pooled intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), as appropriate, may be indicated. If exposed to measles, prophylaxis with pooled intramuscular immunoglobulin (IG) may be indicated (See prescribing information for VZIG and IG). If chicken pox develops, treatment with antiviral agents may be considered. Glucocorticosteroids should be used with caution, if at all, in patients with active or quiescent tuberculosis infection, untreated fungal, bacterial, systemic viral or parasitic infections, or ocular herpes simplex. Other Glucocorticosteroid Effects Monitor patients with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, peptic ulcer, glaucoma or cataracts, or with a family history of diabetes or glaucoma, or with any other condition where glucocorticosteroids may have unwanted effects. Flammable Contents The contents of UCERIS rectal foam include n-butane, isobutane and propane as propellants which are flammable. Instruct the patient to avoid fire, flame, and smoking during and immediately following administration. Patients should temporarily discontinue use of UCERIS rectal foam before initiation of bowel preparation for colonoscopy and consult their health care provider before resuming therapy. Patient And Counseling Information Advise the patient to read the FDA-approved patient labeling (Patient Information and Instructions for Use) Administration Advise patients: UCERIS rectal foam is only to be applied rectally. It is not for oral use. Before using UCERIS rectal foam, use the bathroom to empty your bowels. Each applicator is coated with a lubricant. If additional lubrication is needed, petrolatum or petroleum jelly can also be used. Warm the canister in the hands while shaking it vigorously for 10 to 15 seconds prior to use. UCERIS rectal foam can be used in a standing, lying or sitting position (e.g., while using the toilet). Apply UCERIS rectal foam in the morning and the evening for the first 2 weeks of treatment; then once daily in the evening for the next 4 weeks. When applied in the evening, use immediately prior to bedtime. Try not to empty your bowels again until the next morning. Avoid consumption of grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with UCERIS rectal foam. Avoid fire, flame, and smoking during and immediately following administration since UCERIS rectal foam is flammable. Hypercorticism And Adrenal Suppression Advise patients that UCERIS rectal foam may cause hypercorticism and adrenal suppression and that they should taper slowly from systemic corticosteroids if transferring to UCERIS rectal foam [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. Advise patients that replacement of systemic glucocorticosteroids with UCERIS rectal foam may unmask allergies (e.g., rhinitis and eczema), which were previously controlled by the systemic drug. Increased Risk Of Infection Advise patients to avoid exposure to people with chicken pox or measles and if exposed, consult a physician. Also, inform patients that they are at increased risk of developing a variety of infections, including worsening of existing tuberculosis, fungal, bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections, or ocular herpes simplex and to contact their physician if they develop any symptoms of infection [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. Nonclinical Toxicology Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment Of Fertility Carcinogenicity Carcinogenicity studies with budesonide were conducted in rats and mice. In a 2-year study in Sprague-Dawley rats, budesonide caused a statistically significant increase in the incidence of gliomas in male rats at an oral dose of 50 mcg/kg (approximately 0.12 times the recommended intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day in humans, based on the body surface area). In addition, there were increased incidences of primary hepatocellular tumors in male rats at 25 mcg/kg (approximately 0.06 times the recommended intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day in humans, based on the body surface area) and above. No tumorigenicity was seen in female rats at oral doses up to 50 mcg/kg (approximately 0.12 times the recommended intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day in humans, based on the body surface area). In an additional 2-year study in male Sprague-Dawley rats, budesonide caused no gliomas at an oral dose of 50 mcg/kg (approximately 0.12 times the recommended intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day in humans, based on the body surface area). However, it caused a statistically significant increase in the incidence of hepatocellular tumors at an oral dose of 50 mcg/kg (approximately 0.12 times the recommended intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day in humans, based on the body surface area). The concurrent reference glucocorticosteroids (prednisolone and triamcinolone acetonide) showed similar findings. In a 91-week study in mice, budesonide caused no treatment-related carcinogenicity at oral doses up to 200 mcg/kg (approximately 0.24 times the recommended intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day in humans, based on the body surface area). Mutagenesis Budesonide showed no evidence of mutagenic potential in the Ames test, the mouse lymphoma cell forward gene mutation (TK+/-) test, the human lymphocyte chromosome aberration test, the Drosophila melanogaster sex-linked recessive lethality test, the rat hepatocyte UDS test or the mouse micronucleus test. Impairment Of Fertility In rats, budesonide had no effect on fertility at subcutaneous doses up to 80 mcg/kg(approximately 0.20 times recommended intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day in humans, based on the body surface area). However, it caused a decrease in prenatal viability and viability in pups at birth and during lactation, along with a decrease in maternal body-weight gain, at subcutaneous doses of 20 mcg/kg (approximately 0.05 times recommended intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day in humans, based on the body surface area) and above. No such effects were noted at 5 mcg/kg. Use In Specific Populations Pregnancy Pregnancy Category C. Risk Summary There are no adequate and well controlled studies with UCERIS rectal foam in pregnant women. Animal reproduction studies have been conducted with budesonide. In these studies, subcutaneous administration of budesonide to rats and rabbits at doses 1.2 times and 0.12 times, respectively, the human intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day, produced skeletal abnormalities, fetal loss and decreased pup weight. UCERIS rectal foam should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. All pregnancies, regardless of drug exposure, have a background rate of 2 to 4 percent for major malformations, and 15 to 20 percent for pregnancy loss. Clinical Considerations Fetal/Neonatal Adverse Reactions Hypoadrenalism may occur in neonates exposed to glucocorticosteroids in-utero. Carefully observe these neonates for signs and symptoms of hypoadrenalism. Animal Data Budesonide is teratogenic and embryocidal in rabbits and rats. In subcutaneous embryofetal development studies, fetal loss, decreased pup weights, and skeletal abnormalities were observed at a subcutaneous dose of 25 mcg/kg in rabbits (approximately 0.12 times the recommended human intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day, based on the body surface area) and 500 mcg/kg in rats (approximately 1.2 times the recommended human intrarectal dose of 4 mg/day, based on the body surface area). Nursing Mothers Use of UCERIS rectal foam is likely to result in budesonide in human milk as budesonide delivered by inhalation from a dry powder inhaler is present in human milk at low concentrations. The developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding should be considered along with the mother's clinical need for UCERIS rectal foam and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed child from UCERIS rectal foam or from the underlying maternal condition. Exercise caution when administering UCERIS rectal foam to a nursing woman. Pediatric Use The safety and effectiveness of UCERIS rectal foam has not been established in pediatric patients Children who are treated with corticosteroids by any route may experience a decrease in their growth velocity. This negative impact of corticosteroids on growth has been in the absence of laboratory evidence of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression. The long-term effects of this reduction in growth velocity associated with corticosteroid treatment, including the impact on final adult height, are unknown. Growth velocity may therefore be a more sensitive indicator of systemic corticosteroid exposure in children than some commonly used tests of HPA axis function. The linear growth of children treated with corticosteroids by any route should be monitored (e.g., via stadiometry), and the potential growth effects of prolonged treatment should be weighed against clinical benefits obtained and the availability of other treatment alternatives. In order to minimize the potential growth effects of corticosteroids, children should be titrated to the lowest effective dose. Geriatric Use Clinical studies with UCERIS rectal foam did not include sufficient numbers of patients aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently than younger patients. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy. Hepatic Impairment No dosage adjustment is needed for patients with mild (Child-Pugh Class A) hepatic impairment. Patients with moderate to severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh Class B or C) should be monitored for increased signs and/or symptoms of hypercorticism. Discontinuing the use of UCERIS rectal foam should be considered in these patients if signs of hypercorticism are observed [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY].

More Medical Conditions

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Medical Conditions Definitions Of The Day

  • Dehydratases, 3-Hydroxyacyl ‐ An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the hydration of unsaturated…
  • Genetically Modified Organism ‐ Organisms whose GENOME has been changed by a GENETIC ENGINEERING…
  • Neurotheceomas ‐ A benign myxoma of cutaneous nerve sheath origin. Theke is from…
  • Lens Dislocation ‐ Incomplete rupture of the zonule with the displaced lens remaining…
  • Bakers Cyst ‐ A synovial cyst in the popliteal space arising from the semimembranous…
  • Hiccups ‐ A spasm of the diaphragm that causes a sudden inhalation followed…
  • Thogoto-Like Virus ‐ A genus of the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE comprising tick-borne…
  • Sinus, Dermal ‐ A common congenital midline defect of fusion of the vertebral…
  • Acacia ‐ Any leguminous woody vine or tree of the genus Acacia, also called…
  • Spongiform Encephalopathy, Transmissible ‐ A group of genetic, infectious, or sporadic degenerative human…